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About

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Hannah Melde

Hannah Melde is a Los Angeles based floral designer and naturally dyer with a background in fine art and design who's interests lie in the odd and unlikely beauties of the flora kingdom. In her floral work, the materials she most often chooses to use are ephemeral in nature with an otherworldly charm. She often tries to push the boundaries of what is expected when one thinks wedding flowers. Having assisted in the execution of numerous weddings over the past 5 years she has now set out to take on her own events with the skills and knowledge she has gained from working with studios such as Honey & Poppies, Twig & Twine, and Lavender's Flowers.

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At Golden Heron we believe that there should be no separation in the way florals are approached for weddings and editorial shoots. Why can't your wedding look like a John Galliano fashion show? We love to think out of the box and push past what has been done before. We also really love the planet and strive to be as ecofriendly as possible, meaning we aim for locally grown product and minimize use of earth harming materials like floral foam and plastic. Beyond that, we also save whatever plant waste we can for our sister company Rose Finch to throw in the dyepot and boil up some magic with.

Golden Heron

 

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Rose finch

Rose Finch was born out of Hannah's preexisting fascination with nature and her desire to create a livelihood that not only had minimal negative effects on the earth but could even benefit it. We believe that we (humans) are running out of time to live passively, not knowing where the products we buy come from, who makes them, or what is actually in them. We work hard to make our footprint as small as possible and that goes for every step of our process.  The materials we use to dye generally come from one of two places; either they are ethically foraged, meaning the plant is either invasive or care was taken to make sure the plant will continue to thrive after being harvested from, or are collected plant waste from the floral and food industries. Once the dyebath is prepared all plant matter gets composted and after we are through with the bath it and all other excess water goes to irrigate our native flower garden and urban food forest. Even our tags are made from thrifted card stock as often as we possibly can. It takes much more time to work this way but we believe it is the only way for a healthy future.